How Does the Internet Save Christmas from the Pandemic?

Ah, 2020. America would look back at this year as a year of deep sorrow. No doubt about that. Save for the presidential election, the greatest game-changer of the year is the arrival of the virus. We may hate to admit it, but things are definitely not looking good. As winter comes, a cloud of gloom hangs over continental America. It surely brings about sad memories as a country. A century ago, another pandemic in the form of the 1918 Spanish flu ravaged the Earth, taking with it about 675,000 Americans.

But even with all the suffering, life goes on. And thanks to the internet, we may still have some semblance of Christmas. Just imagine for one moment what life would be without it. It’s really not like before. We’re far more health-conscious now. And through all that, we’re far more critical of the things we do daily. Yes, the pandemic has taught us to improvise. All that made the internet the perfect tool to move forward.

Do Business 

COVID-19 pushed humanity to run a tight ship. And it did that with wanton abandon, without regard for anything. So what happened is business had to adapt or die.

Instead of meeting in person, companies needed to meet without having to meet directly. It’s no accident Zoom became the most talked-about meeting place. It helped people connect without putting them in danger of infection.

Just imagine in March of this year, Zoom daily users rose to 200 million. That’s twice the traffic it got late last year.

A slew of businesses may have forever closed shop this year. But those that survived and thrived were those enterprises which maximized on the Internet. In this sense, the Internet saved a lot of businesses.

How Does the Internet Save Christmas from the Pandemic

For instance, the Internet allowed the delivery of goods. So people can get what they want online. Small wonder Amazon’s value skyrocketed during these months. We call it explosive growth. And the one testament to how strong the online retailer has become is its founder.

Jeff Bezos became the first person on the planet to reach $200 billion in value. While on the other end of the spectrum, his former wife has become the richest woman alive.

And true enough, finding limited options, companies relied heavily on the Internet. SaaS (software as a service) exploded too. Slack and Zoom are classic examples.

So did cloud storage. Being able to store pertinent documents online has become a necessity for companies to survive. Before, companies relied on popular cloud services offered by Google, for instance. Today, sifting through the pricing of cloud backup services has become imperative in ensuring an enterprise’s smooth operation. More than ever, the security of online data has become a central issue today.

Go to School

It was a mad scramble for internet access. At first, educators thought the virus would be contained in weeks. Those weeks turned into months. Now, the year may end without the virus letting up. Worse, talks are now rife; the pandemic will be an endemic, something that lives with us forever. That’s how measles and chickenpox have become.

As online classes became the norm, the holes in the system became more and more apparent. Those who didn’t have the luxury of internet access were left behind. And states are now trying to plug this hole.

For one, Washington has seen how unfortunate it is that not every child has internet access.

Socialize

The COVID-19 pandemic has turned off many liberties in society. It’s a nightmare that came out of a horror movie that no one really expected. And it’s bearing a huge weight on every American on the planet.

You can’t play team sports, for starters. Basketball is out of the question as you could infect or be infected by someone. Parties that used to be a thing on Fridays are also limited. Add restrictions on churches and places of worship, and you have one unimaginably sad world.

But the internet once again has come to the rescue. Social media companies are taking center stage. Yes, the pandemic has offered the perfect opportunity for social media stocks to skyrocket.

As the pandemic locked people in their homes, social media users ballooned. Today, there are over 4.57 billion social media users. That’s up by 346 million in the last six months.

Truly that’s not a bad thing. The Internet has provided a means for people’s lives to continue. It was there before the pandemic. What changed is people now realize how much more meaningful their lives have become with internet access. And that can only mean a Christmas is in the offing. And it’s something we can all look forward to, at least to some degree.

Recommended For You

About the Author: Jacob Wyatt